COUNCIL IN BRIEF: Charlottetown loses polling stations


CHARLOTTETOWN, PEI — The City of Charlottetown is in the process of making changes to its bylaws that will allow Elections P.E.I. to manage its municipal election on November 7.

PEI Elections recently reviewed the bylaws of five municipalities in the province that contract with the office to conduct elections as a municipal election official.

However, there was some debate at a Board Strategic Priorities and Intergovernmental Affairs meeting on June 23 that the fact that Elections P.E.I. manages the city’s elections means that some of the mobile polls that have taken place in the past will not be open this time.

Due to the implementation of the Municipal Government Act in 2017, Elections P.E.I. allow mobile polls in long-term care and community facilities where some voters cannot get to a polling place.

Tim Garrity is the Chief Electoral Officer of Elections PEI. – SaltWire Network

Under the MGA, votes previously held in Charlottetown are not subject to the new regulations. These include Champion Court, Duvar Court, Charlotte Court, Mayfield seniors, Spring Park Court and Sherwood Home.

Tim Garrity, Chief Electoral Officer of Elections PEI, told SaltWire Network on July 12 that the new rules are intended to ensure fairness across the province.


Adding color to Charlottetown

Professional mural painters will be in Charlottetown the week of July 17 to add a splash of color to three landmark buildings in the city.

The three properties are 64 King St., 151 Great George St. and 89 Kent St., the latter being the Charlottetown Fire Department, District 1. City Council passed three separate resolutions, one for each property, during its regular monthly meeting. July 11.

The resolutions require that the murals be painted in accordance with the description and concept submitted to the Planning Department on June 13, that the applicant receive a sign permit, and that the owner work in partnership with Festival Inspire and the economic development of the city. city, tourism and events department to ensure that the mural does not become unsightly due to factors such as paint fading, peeling and marking.

Number of lawns to be mowed

The Charlottetown Public Works Department is cracking down on homeowners who don’t mow their lawns.

At its regular monthly meeting on July 11, the City Council passed a resolution authorizing a crew to enter and mow the lawn, remove and dispose of garbage, all at the owner’s expense, in accordance with the hazards, dangers and unsightly settlement.

Public Works will cut the grass at 16 properties around Charlottetown.  - Pixabay
Public Works will cut the grass at 16 properties around Charlottetown. – Pixabay

Public Works will cut the grass at 16 properties, including 54 Westhill Dr., 55 Westridge Cres., 203 Patterson Dr., 108 Scarlett Ave., 31 Kirkwood Dr., 21 Barrymore Ct., 80 Massey Dr., 599 Queen St. . ., 594 Queen St., 596 Queen St., 38 Valley St., 357 Queen St., 50 Homes Lane, 224 East Royalty Rd., 39 Passmore St. and 89 Heather Ave.

The Unsightly Premises Bylaw is largely complaint-driven, meaning the city will typically act when neighbors complain about a nearby property.

Public works crews are also authorized to remove two abandoned vehicles, at the owner’s expense, at 89 Heather Ave.


Proposal for the demolition of the city’s steam power plant

Maritime Electric is proposing to demolish its Cumberland Street steam plant in Charlottetown and construct a new industrial equipment building.

To do this, the City should modify its concept plan for the comprehensive development area (CDA).

Maritime Electric is proposing to demolish its Cumberland Street steam plant in Charlottetown and construct a new industrial equipment building.  - Google Maps picture
Maritime Electric is proposing to demolish its Cumberland Street steam plant in Charlottetown and construct a new industrial equipment building. – Google Maps picture

So the city council sent the matter to a public meeting for comment.

This will be one of the issues discussed in court at the Rodd Royalty on Capital Drive on July 26 at 7 p.m.

The total area of ​​the site is approximately 28.8 acres, consisting of 14 plots of land and four bodies of water. The proposed building would be located on 2.41 acres.

The request involves the demolition of the existing steam plant and site chimneys. The Steam Building currently houses the utility’s 50 megawatt combustion turbine generator equipment. The equipment will be moved to the new building. Once moved, the steam generator will be demolished.


City firefighters respond to calls

Charlottetown firefighters responded to 66 emergency calls in June, making it their second busiest month so far this year, following January when

77 entered.

Charlottetown firefighters responded to 66 emergency calls in June, making it their second busiest month so far this year, following January when - Dave Stewart/SaltWire Network File Photo
Charlottetown firefighters responded to 66 emergency calls in June, making it their second busiest month so far this year, following January when – Dave Stewart/SaltWire Network File Photo

District 1 Kent Street had 45 emergency responses, including the following: alarm sounded but no fire, 11; accidentally pulled alarm, four; alarm triggered by smoke, steam or dust, eight; alarm triggered due to equipment malfunction, three; alarm triggered because someone was working on the system, one; cooking alarm, five; smell of smoke and burnt rubber, two; mutual aid for a water rescue, two; mutual aid for Island EMS, one; mulch fire, one; propane leak, one; transformer fire, one; black smoke, one; elevator rescue, one; motor vehicle accident, one; propane odor, one; tar pot fire, one.

District 2 on St. Peters Road responded to 21 emergency calls in June, including the following: alarm sounded but no fire, four; alarm detector activated, two; accidentally pulled alarm, three; alarm activated due to smoke, steam or dust, one; alarm triggered due to equipment malfunction, one; alarm triggered because someone was working on the system, one; cooking alarm, one; mutual aid to Island EMS, two; fire in the woods, one; carbon monoxide alarm, two; motor vehicle accident, one; smell of gas, one; fire in the walls, one.

As of June 30, city firefighters had responded to 352 emergency calls this year, roughly matching the number of calls received during the same period in 2021.


Public art projects under consideration

The City of Charlottetown is considering adding public art as part of an upcoming roundabout project in the Sherwood neighborhood.

The city’s Arts Advisory Board has been discussing a public art installation at the intersection that connects Belvedere Avenue to Brackley Point Road and St. Peters Road.

Internal discussions on the budget for this artistic project are ongoing.

The board discussed the possibility of using a living sculpture of two foxes, which were constructed for MosaiCanada 150, consisting of a frame covered with plants. Staff are studying the idea to determine feasibility.

Work on the roundabout itself is expected to begin in August and be completed in the fall.

Additionally, Pride PEI is considering installing a sculpture of Pride wings on the exterior retaining wall of the Confederation Center of the Arts and is currently seeking all necessary approvals.


City sets rules for home-based businesses

A new hair and aesthetics business opens at 8 Brows Ln., Charlottetown.

The city council granted a major waiver to grant a permit for the operation at its regular monthly public meeting on July 11.

The move was necessary because the business will exist as a home occupation in a detached detached house.

However, conditions are attached to the approval of the permit.

Business by appointment can only operate Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with no more than two customers at a time.

The terms also state that the business cannot book more than six clients per day and is entitled to one full-time employee, who is the owner-resident of the accommodation.

The maximum permitted workshop size is 218 square feet or 18% of the gross floor area of ​​the existing principal dwelling.

The business is also entitled to three tandem parking spaces on site, at least 8.5 feet by 18 feet. Street parking is prohibited.


City spends $60,000 on flooring

Charlottetown Council approved $60,000 in partnership funding to support the 2023 Canada Games Host Society.

The money will help pay for a modular sports flooring system and will be charged to the 2022-23 capital budget.

The host company is purchasing a section of the modular flooring for the table tennis event to be held at the Charlottetown Trade Centre, which is attached to the Eastlink Centre. The host society contributes $30,000 while Eastlink Center contributes $30,000.

With the contribution of the City, the host society will be able to purchase an additional floor to cover the entire floor of the rink. It will also allow the surface of the rink to be used during the off-season for sporting activities and events, such as volleyball, badminton, tennis, basketball and pickleball.

Eastlink Center has informed the city that it has the space to store the flooring system.

The city and Eastlink Center will retain ownership of the flooring after the Games.


Dave Stewart is a reporter for the SaltWire Network in Prince Edward Island. He can be contacted by email at [email protected] and followed on Twitter @DveStewart.

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